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Sir Julius Vogel Award Finalists - 2019

Following are the Finalists for the Sir Julius Vogel Awards for 2019. The Finalists are for the 2018 calendar year.

Please note that you must be a member of SFFANZ or a member of GeyserCon to vote for the Sir Julius Vogel awards. Ballot counting takes place at GeyserCon, so you can vote there, email or post your votes to SFFANZ. If you email or post your votes, they must reach us by 29th May, 2019. In all other cases, they must reach us by the close of voting at GeyserCon at 12 noon, Sunday 2nd May 2019.

A postal/email voting form will be available soon if you cannot attend GeyserCon.

All Finalists have been asked to provide links either to their works or, if this is not possible, to descriptions or reviews. We include below all the links that we have received. We will continue to update this page as more information is made available to us.

Nominated works can be downloaded by SFFANZ and GeyserCon members. We will be gathering the works as fast as possible. In the mean time here are instructions for the Sir Julius Vogel Award Voter Packet.

The Long List of nominees is available here.

Professional Award Nominees

Best Novel

The Kingfisher's Debt

Kura Carpenter

(IFWG Publishing)

Restoration Day

Deborah Makarios

(Oi Makarioi)

Into the Sounds

Lee Murray

(Severed Press)

Teeth of the Wolf

Dan Rabarts & Lee Murray

(Raw Dog Screaming Press)

The Voyage of the White Cloud

M. Darusha Wehm

(In Portentia Press)

Best Youth Novel

When Gina Pressed Enter

Elise De Silva

(EDS Publishing)

Ezaara, Riders of Fire, Book 1

Eileen Mueller

(Phantom Feather Press)

Lutapolii – White Dragon of the South

Deryn Pittar

(Junction Publishing)

Quest

A.J. Ponder

(Phantom Feather Press)

The Suburban Book of the Dead

Jamie Sands

Best Novella / Novelette

Where the Sun Does Not Shine

Paul Mannering

(Adrenaline Press)

Skin Deep

Violet Penrose

(Griffon Press)

The Glassblower's Peace

James Rowland

(Published in Aurealis #114, September 2018)

The Martian Job

M. Darusha Wehm

(Choice of Games)

Best Short Story

“On the Run”

Kevin Berry in Te Korero Ahi Kā

(SpecFicNZ)

“Girls Who do not Drown”

A.C. Buchanan

(Apex Magazine, December 2018)

“We Feed the Bears of Fire and Ice”

Octavia Cade

(Strange Horizons)

“A Devoted Husband”

Melanie Harding-Shaw

(Breach Zine)

“Dead End Town”

Lee Murray in Cthulu: Land of the Long White Cloud

(IFWG Publishing)

Best Collected Work

The Fairies of Down Under and other Pākeha Fairy Tales

Geoff Allen

(Makaro Press)

Te Korero Ahi Kā

Edited by Grace Bridges, Lee Murray and Aaron Compton

(SpecFicNZ)

80,000 Totally Secure Passwords that no Hacker Would Ever Guess

Simon Petrie

Cthulu: Land of the Long White Cloud

Edited by Steve Proposch, Christopher Sequiera and Bryce Stevens.

(IFWG Publishing)

Best Professional Artwork

Cover for Te Korero Ahi Kā

Created by Evelyn Doyle

(SpecFicNZ)

Cover for Quest

Created by Craig Phillips

(Phantom Feather Press)

Cover for Capricious 9

Created by Laya Rose

(Capricious)

Cover for The Baker Thief

Created by Laya Rose

(The Kraken Collective)

Best Professional Production/Publication

Breach Magazine, volumes 5-9

Edited by Peter Kirk

New Orbit Magazine

Edited by Naomi Moore (New Orbit Productions)

Writing from a Dark Place

Lee Murray (Victoria University Press)

Overgrown

Laya Rose

Info Text subtitles for Earthshock, on Doctor Who: The Collection – Season 19 Blu-ray Box Set (BBC, 2018)

Paul Scoones (BBC)

Black Archive #15

John Toon

(Obverse Books)

Best Dramatic Presentation

Wellington Paranormal

Directed by Jermaine Clement and Jackie van Beek

(New Zealand Documentary Board)

Mortal Engines

Directed by Christian Rivers

(Universal Pictures)

Fan Award Nominees

Best Fan Artwork

The Thirteenth Doctor

Laya Rose

Best Fan Production/ Publication

The Future According to Mikey

(Curdled Milk Productions)

Star Trek in the Park – The Trouble with Tribbles

(Enterprise Entertainment)

Phoenixine

Edited by John and Lynelle Howell

(Phoenix Science Fiction Society)

Special Award Nominees

Best New Talent

(Nominations are numbered to aid clarity — the number has no other significance).

1. Kura Carpenter

The Kingfisher's Debt is Kura Carpenter's debut novel and very cleverly set in an Urban Fantasy world overlaying (or underlying, depending on your perspective) Dunedin, New Zealand. The writing is crisp, the plot excellently designed and executed. The work, I believe, clearly shows a writer who has taken the writing process seriously, from conception to drafting, to re-drafting, and producing a book that fits neatly into the Urban Fantasy genre while also having a strong Kiwi flavour.


2. Saf Davidson

With her unique and empathetic perspectives on disability, sexuality, and the human condition, Saf Davidson has quickly cemented herself as one of the foremost upcoming New Zealand SFF writers. Her work on serials "Tourist" and "Mountain Sound" has garnered broad praise, and as an award-winning comics writer and editor of games, it's clear that she refuses to be put in a box—whether creatively or professionally.


3. M.W. Innes-Jones

As Concealment’s publisher, I nominate and highly recommend this fast paced, action packed and gripping Sci-Fi novel. The below precis speaks for itself.

Our genes: will they be our hope or our undoing?

Three centuries from now humanity has made its last stand – a city high in the Swiss Alps, a place of safety and security from a deadly past. This is the reality of Nathanial Paquette’s life and it has been this way for the whole of his sheltered twenty-three years. But with a knock at the family’s apartment door everything changes. Now he must face an uncertain future and unexpected truth – he is genetically altered, and what really matters is what lies hidden within his blood.

Together with eleven others, Nathanial discovers not only does he have to navigate the competing agendas of the city’s ruling council and a man of science but survive the rigorous training he and his fellow recruits are faced with.

It’s a world where friendships are forged, enemies are made, and death awaits – ever wanting to become everyone’s new best friend.

This is the first book of a six-book saga, I promise you, you will be on the edge of your seat from the beginning to the end. The author quickly draws you into the characters’ lives and their world and moves the story along at pace. Using compelling language, this new author reels you into the narrative and leaves you wanting for more.


4. Deborah Makarios

Deborah Makarios has produced a beautifully presented novel that is warm, laugh-out-loud funny, full of twists, and well-drawn characters. The fantasy has not only believable characters, but the land itself is a key character, possessing a magic of its own. She sticks to her genre, but the surprises are many along the way, and the ending is satisfyingly positive. Effortlessly woven into the fast-moving story, there are many current themes - the environment, justice, corporate greed and racism - even though the setting is old. I can't wait to see what Makarios produces next.


The back-cover description of the novel is as follows:

"Princess Lily was born to be queen, but she leads a pawn’s existence in the shadow of her guardians’ control. She dreams of the day when she will take her rightful place in the world.

At last her chance arrives, with a quest for the three Requisites of Restoration Day, the royal rite which renews the life of the land. But she’s been hidden away too long, and Arcelia has changed.

Stripped of everything but the identity which has become a life-threatening liability, Lily will need to do more than cross the board if she is to emerge triumphant as the queen she knows she must be. The land she thought was hers becomes the field for a gripping game–and this time she’s playing for her life."



5. Fraser Newman


6. Anna Ryan

Since writing and publishing her first novel (The Lady in the Coat) in 2017, Anna's confidence of writing horror stories has been continually improving. She is a real enigma in the world of horror writing.

What astounds more than anything, is that Anna understands how the brain works; how we, as human beings cope/deal with fear, terror and paranoia.

After reading Deceptive Cadence, Anna's collection of short stories, you will question the noises you hear as you drift off to sleep at night. Could there really be someone lurking outside you window, waiting?

And let's not forget the monsters living in The Room at the End of the Hall. They cannot be real, can they?

You will seriously second guess yourself after you have read Deceptive Cadence. You will jump at every noise you hear.

Anna Ryan is an up and coming writer with imagination and writing skill to be a hugely successful horror writer

 

Note: Nominees are presented in randomised order.

The Sir Julius Vogel Awards recognise excellence in Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror by New Zealanders.

The Sir Julius Vogel Awards are given for work by fans and professionals that was undertaken, completed or released in the year previous to voting. This year the works being voted on are from 2017. They are voted on by New Zealand fans and are presented at the National Science Fiction convention each year.

The Sir Julius Vogel Awards are administered by SFFANZ, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc.

SFFANZ supports Science Fiction and Fantasy in New Zealand and can be contacted at enquiries@sffanz.org.nz http://www.sffanz.org.nz

SFFANZ is a non-profit organisation and registered charity
designed to bring together fans of the fantastic in New Zealand

Contact us by email at: enquiries@sffanz.org.nz